Friday, August 30, 2013

Toward a multilateral framework for investment

The essay below is published as part of the continuing discussion on the feasibility and desirability of a multilateral framework for investment.

Nicolle Graugnard, ‘Toward a multilateral framework for investment’ Columbia FDI Perspectives, No. 103, September 2, 2013. Reprinted with permission from the Vale Columbia Center on Sustainable International Investment (www.vcc.columbia.edu).

Toward a multilateral framework for investment

Nicolle Graugnard*

Friday, August 23, 2013

An argument against a multilateral framework for investment

“Axel Berger, ‘The futile debate over a multilateral framework for investment,’ Columbia FDI Perspectives, No. 102, August 26, 2012, is reprinted with kind permission from the Vale Columbia Center on Sustainable International Investment (www.vcc.columbia.edu).

 The futile debate over a multilateral framework for investment
by
Axel Berger*

Thursday, August 15, 2013

Five dangers the internet poses to a sustainable world

It's time to slay the sacred cow that the internet is a force only for good


by Chandran Nair

[This article was published in The Guardian on Friday August 9th, 2013. It represents the opinion of the author and is published on the Growing Capacity Blog unchanged by permission of the author.]

In recent months the world has been consumed by the tit for tat internet spying allegations between the US and China.

Then came the news that the NSA has worked with some of the internet's leading companies to not only spy on American citizens but those of Europe and Hong Kong as well.


Much of the ensuing debate has thus been about the erosion of privacy by the state and by large corporations increasingly using big data to "understand" customers and the behaviour of their staff.


But in the midst of this obsession with the privacy issue there has been little attention to other equally corrosive impacts of the internet revolution. Part of the problem is that until very recently, but hopefully no longer, the debate was framed in such a way as to cast any and all critics of the internet as either luddites or somehow anti-freedom.